Private MRI Scan


Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique that uses a magnetic field and computer-generated radio waves to create detailed images of the organs and tissues in your body.

Most MRI machines are large, tube-shaped magnets. When you lie inside an MRI machine, the magnetic field inside works with radio waves and hydrogen atoms in your body to create cross-sectional images — like slices in a loaf of bread.

The MRI machine also can produce 3D images that can be viewed from different angles.


Private MRI Scan


Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique that uses a magnetic field and computer-generated radio waves to create detailed images of the organs and tissues in your body.

Most MRI machines are large, tube-shaped magnets. When you lie inside an MRI machine, the magnetic field inside works with radio waves and hydrogen atoms in your body to create cross-sectional images — like slices in a loaf of bread.

The MRI machine also can produce 3D images that can be viewed from different angles.

Why it's done.


MRI is a noninvasive way for a medical professional to examine your organs, tissues and skeletal system. It produces high-resolution images of the inside of the body that help diagnose a variety of conditions.

MRI of the brain and spinal cord

MRI is the most frequently used imaging test of the brain and spinal cord. It's often performed to help diagnose: Aneurysms of cerebral vessels. Conditions of the eye and inner ear. Multiple sclerosis. Spinal cord conditions. Stroke. Tumors. Brain injury from trauma.

A special type of MRI is the functional MRI of the brain, also known as fMRI. It produces images of blood flow to certain areas of the brain. Functional MRI can be used to examine the brain's anatomy and show which parts of the brain are handling critical functions, language and movements. This information can help guide decisions when considering someone for brain surgery.

Functional MRI also can check for damage from a head injury or from conditions such as Alzheimer's disease.

MRI of the heart and blood vessels

MRI that focuses on the heart or blood vessels can check: Size and function of the heart's chambers. Thickness and movement of the walls of the heart. Extent of damage caused by heart attacks or heart disease. Structural problems in the aorta, such as aneurysms or dissections. Inflammation or blockages in the blood vessels.

MRI of other internal organs

MRI can check for tumors or other irregularities in many organs in the body, including the following: Liver and bile ducts. Kidneys. Spleen. Pancreas. Uterus. Ovaries. Prostate.

MRI of bones and joints

MRI can help look for: Joint issues caused by traumatic or repetitive injuries, such as torn cartilage or ligaments. Disk problems in the spine. Bone infections. Tumors of the bones and soft tissues.

MRI of the breasts

MRI can be used with mammography to detect breast cancer, particularly in people who have dense breast tissue or who might be at high risk of the disease.

How do I prepare for an MRI procedure?

EAT/DRINK

: You may eat, drink and take medications as usual for most MRI exams. There are some specialty MRI exams that require certain restrictions. You will be provided detailed preparations instructions by Johns Hopkins Medical Imaging when you schedule your exam.

CLOTHING

: You will be asked to remove all clothing, including underwear, and lock up all personal belongings. Please remove all piercings and leave all jewelry and valuables at home.

WHAT TO EXPECT

: Imaging takes place inside of a large, tubelike structure that is open on both ends. You must lie perfectly still for quality images. Due to the MRI machine's loud noise, earplugs are required and will be provided.

ALLERGY

: Some MRI exams require IV contrast. If you have had an allergic reaction to MRI contrast, contact your ordering physician to obtain the recommended prescription. You will likely take this by mouth 24, 12 and two hours prior to the examination.

ANTI-ANXIETY MEDICATION

: If you require anti-anxiety medication due to claustrophobia, contact your ordering physician for a prescription. You must bring your prescription on the day of your appointment. Please note that you will need someone to drive you home.

STRONG MAGNETIC ENVIRONMENT

: Due to the strong magnetic field, you must inform your doctor prior to the appointment if you have any metal in your body. Detailed information will be needed, such as the type and location, to determine your eligibility for MRI. If you have metal in your body that was not disclosed before your appointment, your study may be delayed, rescheduled or canceled upon your arrival until more information can be obtained. Based on your medical condition, your health care provider may require other preparations. When you call to make an appointment, it is extremely important that you inform your doctor if any of the following apply to you: You have a pacemaker or have had heart valves replaced. You have any type of implantable pump, such as an insulin pump. You have vessel coils, filters, stents, or clips. You are pregnant or think you might be pregnant. You have ever had a bullet wound. You have ever worked with metal (for example, as a metal grinder or welder). You have metallic fragments anywhere in the body.

What happens after an MRI?


You should move slowly when getting up from the scanner table to avoid any dizziness or lightheadedness from lying flat during the procedure. If any sedatives were taken for the procedure, you may be required to rest until they have worn off. You will also need to avoid driving. If contrast dye was used during the procedure and you experience any side effects or reactions to the contrast dye, such as itching, swelling, rash or difficulty breathing after your appointment call your doctor right away.

If you notice any pain, redness and/or swelling at the IV site after you return home, you should notify your doctor, as this could indicate an infection or other type of reaction. Otherwise, no special type of care is required after an MRI scan. You may resume your usual diet and activities unless your doctor advises you differently. Your doctor may give you more or alternate instructions after the procedure depending on your particular situation.

How do I prepare for an MRI procedure?

EAT/DRINK

: You may eat, drink and take medications as usual for most MRI exams. There are some specialty MRI exams that require certain restrictions. You will be provided detailed preparations instructions by Johns Hopkins Medical Imaging when you schedule your exam.

CLOTHING

: You will be asked to remove all clothing, including underwear, and lock up all personal belongings. Please remove all piercings and leave all jewelry and valuables at home.

WHAT TO EXPECT

: Imaging takes place inside of a large, tubelike structure that is open on both ends. You must lie perfectly still for quality images. Due to the MRI machine's loud noise, earplugs are required and will be provided.

ALLERGY

: Some MRI exams require IV contrast. If you have had an allergic reaction to MRI contrast, contact your ordering physician to obtain the recommended prescription. You will likely take this by mouth 24, 12 and two hours prior to the examination.

ANTI-ANXIETY MEDICATION

: If you require anti-anxiety medication due to claustrophobia, contact your ordering physician for a prescription. You must bring your prescription on the day of your appointment. Please note that you will need someone to drive you home.

STRONG MAGNETIC ENVIRONMENT

: Due to the strong magnetic field, you must inform your doctor prior to the appointment if you have any metal in your body. Detailed information will be needed, such as the type and location, to determine your eligibility for MRI. If you have metal in your body that was not disclosed before your appointment, your study may be delayed, rescheduled or canceled upon your arrival until more information can be obtained. Based on your medical condition, your health care provider may require other preparations. When you call to make an appointment, it is extremely important that you inform your doctor if any of the following apply to you: You have a pacemaker or have had heart valves replaced. You have any type of implantable pump, such as an insulin pump. You have vessel coils, filters, stents, or clips. You are pregnant or think you might be pregnant. You have ever had a bullet wound. You have ever worked with metal (for example, as a metal grinder or welder). You have metallic fragments anywhere in the body.

 

Schedule an Appointment


Contact our team today and arrange your Private MRI Scan today.

 

Schedule an Appointment


Contact our team today and arrange your Private GP appointment.

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